Top 10 Most Read Last Week On Javablogs.com, Week 21


Most read last week

  1. Spring vs JBoss, and why I don’t care about Sun standards (272): After a long time, it was interesting to see the Spring and JBoss folks engage in a public war of words, in comments on Matt Raible’s blog. [read]

  2. Kent Beck: "We thought we were just programming on an airplane" (231): JUnit co-creator Kent Beck says a number of things convinced he and Erich Gamma to create a new revision of JUnit after a long hiatus, including TestNG and Java 5. Last week at JavaOne, [read]

  3. Where are you, Project Manager with Technical Skills? (204): In Spain we are facing again a lack of workers with experience in development of not-so-cutting-edge technologies like J2EE. So, [read]

  4. Thanks... and good luck Bruce! (203): It is unfortunate that Bruce Tate forgot to enable comments to his final blog entry. It would be a shame to see him off without at least a small well-wishing. (possibly a little roast too ;-) [read]

  5. Google Web Toolkit Angst (202): I've been using Google Web Toolkit for the last week or so. I'm really liking it, it is really productive and once you getting it working everything is sweet. The problem is, [read]

  6. Is this simpler than Hibernate? (193): In an earlier blog entry I described an early cut of DynaModel, Slingshot's persistence engine. [read]

  7. Article: Don't repeat the DAO! : Build a generic typesafe DAO with Hibernate and Spring AOP (192): Don't repeat the DAO! : Build a generic typesafe DAO with Hibernate and Spring AOP is a developerWorks article by Per Mellqvist which presents a generic DAO implementation class based on Hibernate, [read]

  8. Why ORM Tools are Not Recommended (185): Sandeep Sha has written an a forum posting by Why ORM Tools are Not Recommended that has some interesting points. Although I do not agree with all the points, [read]

  9. The Dojo Toolkit in Practice (185): We have posted a new article on using the Dojo Toolkit in a project. The article discusses a piece of a project that uses Ajax to create a responsive itinerary viewer. [read]


Most read last week-end

  1. Spring vs JBoss, and why I don’t care about Sun standards (272): After a long time, it was interesting to see the Spring and JBoss folks engage in a public war of words, in comments on Matt Raible’s blog. [read]

  2. Thanks... and good luck Bruce! (203): It is unfortunate that Bruce Tate forgot to enable comments to his final blog entry. It would be a shame to see him off without at least a small well-wishing. (possibly a little roast too ;-) [read]

  3. Is this simpler than Hibernate? (193): In an earlier blog entry I described an early cut of DynaModel, Slingshot's persistence engine. [read]

  4. What’s Up With Huge Resumes? (150): What’s up with huge resumes these days? The company I work for has been hiring lately and so I usually end up interviewing one to two people a week. [read]

  5. Introducing jvm-languages.com (147): Back in September of 2004, I tried to write a book. It would have been called Dynamic Languages and Java. Unfortunately, I never completed it. [read]

  6. Comparison Between PMD vs Findbugs vs Hammurapi (135): Take a look at this one the differences between these three tools Differences [read]

  7. Then God said let there be Ubuntu... ahem (130): Finally I got a version of Linux, which works as good as XP or even better ;) ; using which I can get to do my work seamlessly. Its none other than Ubuntu Dapper. [read]

  8. Job Trend, Not Google Trend (121): Wanna know the amount of Java jobs versus .Net jobs, or the growth of AJAX jobs? Google Trend may be able to help you a bit, but the result is not scoped for jobs only. Indeed. [read]

  9. 1-Minute Quiz: Why is Hyphen Illegal in Identifier? (110): Why is hyphen (-) an illegal char in Java identifier? Why can't we use variable names like first-name, as we do in xml files? The answer to this question is not hard, but the challenge is, [read]


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